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How Do You Know It Is Morning Sickness?

Understanding the Symptoms

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sick pregnant woman leaning over a sink

Many moms to be experience morning sickness is some way or another -- if you haven't had to ask yourself “Is it morning sickness?” you're in luck!

Morning sickness can range from feeling slightly queasy to being put off by certain foods or smells to being physically sick. Although it's called morning sickness, many moms report that they can feel ill at any time during the day.

Feeling ill is normal, but if you can't function or you're unable to keep anything down, it's important to call your healthcare provider. Most of the time, the baby receives all of the essential nutrients from a mom's nutrition stores, so as long as you're staying hydrated, your baby will be fine, but if you're worried, call your doctor or midwife for advice.

Treating Morning Sickness

Most of the time there's no real treatment for morning sickness. However, if you're suffering, there are some things that you can try to help alleviate the symptoms when it is morning sickness. These remedies include:

  • Eating small amounts of food throughout the day

  • Getting plenty of rest

  • Nibbling on bland foods, like crackers, before getting out of bed in the morning

  • Sipping and eating ginger flavored foods, such as ginger ale or ginger snaps (talk to your doctor before starting any ginger supplements however)

  • Avoiding certain foods or smells that cause queasiness

  • Acupressure bands worn around your wrist

If your morning sickness lasts for a very long time or is severe, you may have a condition called hyperemis gravidarum. Your healthcare provider may prescribe anti-nausea medications, especially if you appear to be dehydrated.

If you have severe dehydration or ketosis, you may be admitted to the hospital. Your doctor will prescribe an IV to rehydrate you. If you feel like your morning sickness may be hyperemis gravidarum, it's important to mention it to your doctor so you can receive the necessary treatment.

The information here is not a substitute for actual medical advice, examination or diagnosis by a doctor, nurse, midwife, or other healthcare provider.

 
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