Home > Mom > Family Health Concerns > What is Nausea?

What is Nausea?

What are the symptoms? What are the treatments?

   PRINT

Nausea is the term used for feeling sick or as if you're going to be sick. It's a symptom rather than an illness in its own right, and can affect anyone. In some cases, anxiety about being sick can bring on nausea or make it worse. Children are particularly susceptible to nausea, as are moms-to-be. Nausea is the term used for feeling sick or as if you're going to be sick. It's a symptom rather than an illness in its own right, and can affect anyone. In some cases, anxiety about being sick can bring on nausea or make it worse. Children are particularly susceptible to nausea, as are moms-to-be.

A common type of nausea in children is motion sickness, brought on by travelling. It happens when there's a conflict of messages to the brain from the eyes and the delicate inner ear balance mechanisms. Symptoms can improve as your child's systems adapt to the conditions. Most children grow out of travel sickness. Nausea is also very common in pregnancy, especially in the first three months, after which it stops in most moms-to-be. It's caused by hormonal changes and is accompanied by vomiting in almost half of all expectant moms.

What are the symptoms of Nausea?

Feeling queasy or as if you may vomit.

What are the treatments and remedies of Nausea?

Medical treatment is not usually necessary for nausea, but there is medication available for severe vomiting. These are called anti-emetics, but not all may be suitable for taking during pregnancy, so consult your health professional.

The best course of self-help for nausea in pregnancy includes:

  • avoiding triggers, such as certain foods or cooking smells
  • avoiding other smells that make nausea worse, such as tobacco smoke
  • wearing loose, comfortable clothing without restrictive waistbands
  • keeping cool
  • eating small, plain snacks, like dry crackers, toast or digestive biscuits
  • eating small, frequent meals throughout the day rather than three main meals
  • wearing acupressure wrist bands
  • sipping cool, carbonated drinks in between meals rather than with food
  • sucking ice cubes
  • Try eating ginger biscuits or cake.

And in travel-sick children:

  • giving them an anti-travel sickness treatment prior to setting out
  • if they're old enough, allowing them to sit in the front, in an age appropriate car seat, where they get a long view to the horizon
  • giving them acupressure wrist bands to wear
  • opening windows or switching on air conditioning
  • ncouraging them to sleep.

This guide

This article is not meant to substitute medical advice provided by a practicing medical professional - if you have any concerns, contact your physician immediately.

 
3PREVIOUS ARTICLE MOM NEXT ARTICLE4
 
   PRINT